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WINGED WORDS, PHRASEOLOGICAL UNITS
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Winged words, phraseological units

 

Random phraseology:

Look out!

Meaning:

Joking advice to be prudent, to beware of all sorts of sedition, not to allow disloyal behavior, etc. It is also used as an ironic commentary on such philistine, loyal fears.

Origin:

The 42nd aphorism from the collection of thoughts and aphorisms "The Fruits of Thought" by Kozma Prutkov. This aphorism is the verb "watch" (be vigilant) in the imperative mood.

 

Random phraseology:

Favorite city can sleep peacefully.

Meaning:

It's all right, there's nothing to worry about (joking ironically).

Origin:

From the song "Beloved City", written by composer Nikita Bogoslovsky to the verses of Yevgeny Aronovich Dolmatovsky (b. 1915) for the film "Fighters" (1939). After the performance of this song by Mark Bernes, who played the role of pilot Sergei Kozhukharov in this film, she became widely known: "Comrade will pass all the battles and wars, // Not knowing sleep, not knowing silence. // Beloved city can sleep peacefully // And see dreams, and turn green in the middle of spring.

 

Random phraseology:

The enemy does not sleep.

Meaning:

Stay vigilant!

Origin:

The expression is a paraphrase of one of the gospel sayings: "Be sober, be awake, because your adversary walks around like a roaring lion, looking for someone to devour" (Gospel, First Epistle of the Apostle Peter, 5:8).

 

Random phraseology:

A ticket to life.

Meaning:

About something that gives a person reason to hope that a full, interesting, organized life awaits him ahead.

Origin:

Title of the film (1931), directed by Nikolai Vladimirovich Ekk (pseudonym N.V. Ivakina, 1902-1976) based on his own script (with the participation of Alexander Borisovich Stolper, 1907-1979). The plot of the film - former homeless children, and now the inhabitants of the children's labor commune, find, thanks to skilled educators, their way in life, become worthy members of society. An expression similar in meaning existed in the Russian language before. For example, A. I. Herzen wrote about "the road to life", meaning a certificate of graduation from an educational institution. So, in his novel "Who is to blame?" he writes: "Finally, the course also ended; at the act, the young men were handed out travel guides to life." In the same sense, he uses this expression in his work "Amateurism in Science" (v. 3): "A young man who has received a diploma ... takes it for an act of liberation from school, for a life on the road ..."

 

Random phraseology:

Listen, lie, but know the measure!

Meaning:

Jokingly ironic advice to moderate your imagination, to somehow conform your inventions with the requirements of plausibility.

Origin:

From the comedy "Woe from Wit" (1824) by A. S. Griboyedov (1795-1829). The words of Chatsky addressed to Repetilov (act. 4, yavl. 4).

 

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